Best Boat Deals: Expert’s Choice—Jarvis Newman, Sea Ray, Bertram

It’s the time of year when a lot of us have a bit of wanderlust rolling around our souls. Some folks may like ice fishing, but you’ll be able to tell from this month’s Expert’s Choice deals that we’ve got warmer climes and sunshine on our minds. Whether you’re interested in going after the big ones offshore, cruising south for the winter, or trailering your aquatic fun platform somewhere where it’s warm, we think you’ll dig at least one of the great boats below.


This story will be available in the future as part of Boat Trader’s Best Boat Deals series,  but the boat listings below may not be. If you click through to an expired link it means that someone nabbed the bargain — or the owner had second thoughts about selling.

– Boat Trader editors


1994 Jarvis Newman 46

1994 Jarvis Newman 46

1994 Jarvis Newman 46

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If you know anything about Downeast boats—lobster and trawler-type yachts alike—you know that Jarvis Newman has produced some of the sweetest-looking Downeast yachts ever to hit the water. This 46-foot model, built in 1994 by Malcolm Pettegrow in Mount Desert Island, ME, caught our eye for a number of reasons, not least of which is her sheer beauty. If you’ve been looking for a true Downeast cruising yacht with lots of style, read on.

Below you’ll find a capacious main saloon with a large, L-shaped dinette to starboard, stowage cabinetry and seating to port, and the lower helm station, which is situated all the way forward to starboard. Large expanses of glass and opening windows mean there’s plenty of light and ventilation. A set of steps lead down to a well-equipped galley with full-size refrigerator/freezer, propane stove/oven, and lots of counter space. Guest accommodations are farther forward to port, while the main stateroom is in the bow. An enclosed head to starboard is shared by guests and owners.

Exterior spaces are equally as luxurious and comfortable. The aft cockpit is wide, open, and smothered in teak, giving it a warm, secure feeling. A set of steps leads up to the flybridge, which in addition to its ample lounging accommodations, has enough room for a hard or inflatable dinghy—either is easily hoisted from the water using a sturdy lifting boom. The flybridge helm is packed with electronics, two comfortable swiveling captain’s chairs, and provides a commanding view both forward and aft. A large bimini top keeps things comfortable when the weather turns wet or the sun is aiming to bake your brain.

In the engine room sits a single 1,000-horsepower MTU diesel with 2,420 hours, a 12.5-kilowatt Westerbeke generator with 1,400 hours, Xantrex inverter, Fireboy Halon fire system, Allcraft hot-water heater, and Glendenning shore power cable retraction system. A set of reverse-cycle air conditioners keep things cool or warm above, as weather requires, either extending the cruising system or helping cruisers endure the shoulder seasons heading north or south. No doubt about it, this is one serious cruising platform.

2007 Sea Ray 240 Sundeck

2007 Sea Ray 240 Sundeck

2007 Sea Ray 240 Sundeck

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Looking for fun time in the sunshine? Chockful of clever and comfortable ways to relax and lounge on the water, the Sea Ray 240 Sundeck is a comfy bowrider with some watersports capabilities baked in. This recent model has had $12,000 worth of improvements invested into her.

One of the best parts about this boat is that it’s a Sea Ray, so it’s engineered and built by one of the most respected companies in the business. What that means is that you’ll not only enjoy a boat that rides great and has exhilarating performance, but also has tons of clever comfort and relaxation features poured into the mix.

The 240 Sundeck is fitted with a 5.7-liter MerCruiser gasoline inboard engine mated to a Bravo sterndrive. That’s plenty of juice to get folks up on waterskis or boards plenty fast, and also provides a speedy top end just under 50 mph. This one’s only got 195 hours on it. It’s also worth mentioning that this boat is equipped with a watersports tower with integral tow pylon and an expansive swim platform that makes getting in and out of the water and donning boards and skis quick and easy.

Inside the Sea Ray 240 Sundeck is a clever layout with an emphasis on the comfort and relaxation we mentioned earlier. The bow has port and starboard seats that can be used as benches, or as forward-facing chaise lounges. Between them is a spot to place a table insert—an easy and quick way to create a dining space. Aft in the cockpit is an L-shaped lounge at the transom with a food prep/wet bar adjacent to it. Twin swiveling captain’s chairs sit behind the two consoles. A head is hidden beneath the port console. The whole area is covered from the sun by a large bimini top. All in all, there’s plenty of room for a party, a snooze, or a day pulling skiers.

1962 Bertram 31 with Yanmar Diesels

1962 Bertram 31 with Yanmar Diesels

1962 Bertram 31 with Yanmar Diesels

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If you know anything about sportfishing boats, you know that the Bertram 31 is one of the most legendary sportfish boats ever made. In fact it’s one of the most influential and innovative boats ever built. Designed by legendary naval architect Raymond C. Hunt, the Bertram 31 influenced the use of deep-V hulls in offshore fishing boats for decades to come. So when we came across a 1962 model with Yanmar diesel inboard power, we went in for a closer look.
Browsing through the listing pictures we found lots of customization. This Bertram 31 has teak railing surrounding the aft cockpit, a teak and holly sole in the cabin, beautiful sea foam topside paint, a five-kilowatt Northern Lights generator, custom upholstery, underwater LED lights, dripless shaft seals, a teak deck in the cockpit, glossy teak transom, and more. She also looks extremely well maintained, as evidenced by a new bottom and bottom paint in 2015, a complete rewiring the same year, and new cockpit, engine room, and flybridge paint in 2012.

She’s powered by twin 480-horspower Yanmar diesels with 1,700 hours on them.  They were recently fully inspected by a certified Yanmar technician. And here’s the reason for the lowered price on this beauty: Her starboard engine is ready for a rebuild. Now, before you go running away wondering why we’ve included a boat with an engine in need of a rebuild or replacement, consider that even if you sink $5,000 into a rebuild or more for a new engine, this boat is still listed well below what other Bertram 31s fetch in this market, many not upgraded like this one. If it were us, we wouldn’t bat an eye at rebuilding or replacing one or both engines, because we’d still be ahead at this asking price.

This boat has the classic Bertram 31 interior, which features a starboard-side galley and a single bench in the main saloon. Farther below is an expansive V-berth in the master stateroom with a head situated underneath. There’s plenty of light and ventilation below, thanks to huge side windows, a forward hatch, and a large opening door that leads to and from the cockpit. Though somewhat spartan, she’s set up as a fishing machine first and an overnighter/cruiser second.

If you’re on the hunt for a classic Bertram 31 at a bargain price that needs a little TLC in the engine department but is flawless otherwise, scoop this one up.

 

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