Stamas 289 Tarpon: Offshore Pedigree

The Stamas boatbuilding company has been a going concern in Florida since before World War II.  Nick and Pete Stamas of Tarpon Springs learned the traditional craft in the 1930s, then made the bold move to fiberglass in the 1950s. Today, the Stamas plant is still in Tarpon Springs, and the family builder is still turning out well-designed, well-built boats in a variety of models (12 at the time of this writing) from about 29 to 40 feet LOA.

The Stamas 289 Tarpon center-console is a development of the successful 270. The 289 is also available in a cuddy cabin version called the Aegean.

The Stamas 289 Tarpon cernter-console is a development of the successful 270. The 289 is also available in a cuddy cabin version called the Aegean.

There’s a recent revision in the line-up called the 289 Tarpon, which is a development of a Stamas stalwart, the 270. The hull is the same, but the extra length comes mainly from a beefy anchor pulpit added to the deck mold. More importantly, the tried-and-true underwater hull design hasn’t changed. Transom deadrise peaks at 24 degrees, and there’s both volume and flare up forward, making the boat seakindly for offshore angling. The 9’7” beam gives stability, while good cockpit depth, wide coamings, and toe-kick space under the coaming bolsters mean secure footing and leg bracing for casting and working with fish alongside.

The dash on the 289 Tarpon offers plenty of room for electronics.

The dash on the 289 Tarpon offers plenty of room for electronics.

Like the other offshore boats in the Stamas line, this one is built with closed-cell foam for flotation. Another notable construction detail is that all the major components, including the inner liners and the hull-deck joint, are glassed together before being mechanically fastened. This makes for a super-strong, quiet ride. It also lets Stamas offer a seven-year structural warranty on the hull.  Here’s more on Stamas construction details.

Although there’s an inboard power option, most people will choose twin outboards for simplicity, redundancy offshore, and space savings in the cockpit.  Maximum combined power for the outboards is 450 hp.

The same hull is offered in a cuddy-cabin version called the 289 Aegean. There’s still plenty of fishability, but also a convertible dinette/V-berth where the kids can nap,  a small enclosed head, and a galley area.

Watch Lenny Rudow’s First-Look video of the 289 Tarpon (just before Stamas changed from the 270 name) at the Miami Boat Show, below. Read his full review: Stamas Tarpon 289: Bread and Butter Fish Boat. And for more information, visit Stamas.

 

 

 

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